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20121205
20121213
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CNBC 6
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CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 9:00am EST
it's called fiscal cliff. and called radical tax increase. it was meant to cause a recession. the government felt in its infinite wisdom that -- >> you think it's a radical tax increase? >> i think so, yeah. i think you'll notice it in your paycheck for certain. >> that's absolutely for sure. >> your first check, second paycheck, then you get the chaos that bowles mentioned. and the chaos is, wow, i have much less to spend. i didn't know this was coming. alternative minimum tax being the silent killer who really understands how much more they have to pay, check at the end of the year. do the math. >> we saw it in the consumer sentiment numbers, and what it will be when the increases actually go through. most of that decline in sentiment that we saw on friday was from households earning more than $75,000. a higher income in this survey, households felt it the most, even though it's not here technically. >> one of the more interesting conversations over the weekend was bob corker saying, let's just go ahead, concede to the tax argument, which would flip the entire spotlight ont
CNBC
Dec 12, 2012 9:00am EST
boehner speaking by telephone on tuesday changing fiscal cliff proposals. reducing new tax revenue from 1.6 to $1.4 trillion over five years. but they're jockeying on who should spell out the specifics on the spending cuts. walmart's ceo mike duke expressed concerns about the fiscal cliff. >> the week before the election, only one-fourth, 25% of our core customers even knew what fiscal cliff meant. okay? one week after the election, it was up to 75%. now these same customers, 15% of our customers are telling us, this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> that's a fascinating read on -- >> i wonder who's doing the surveying? how is that occurring? >> greeters? >> i would be curious how they know those percentages. do they ask people at the -- >> yeah. >> and can you define the fiscal cliff? i don't mean to question the methodology, it's interesting. >> just curious. >> i think that when i was in washington, i got the sense that there were just a lot of people there who actually thought romney was going to win. and there would be no fiscal cliff because
CNBC
Dec 7, 2012 9:00am EST
is a fiscal cliff and concern about rising taxes in those consumer sentiment numbers creeping in and those higher income households pulled back on spending expectations on big ticket items of vehicles and appliances and consumer durables. that's significant. in terms of sandy, one thing i would note is on unemployment survey it was taken on november 5th, the day before the election. remember, there was a nor'easter a few days later that compounded some of the disruptions related to sandy and many of the unemployment insurance claims because people couldn't get out to make the unemployment claims didn't occur until the peak in the middle of november. i think the timing of this survey really did matter in this. steve made a good point on earlier than usual thanksgiving maybe swamping some of the retail effects that we would have seen from sandy because of the seasonals and the way the data was captured. i don't think underlying economy is that much stronger with downward revisions we saw in previous months. i do think the fact that timing and nor'easter was also in here and that did down air
CNBC
Dec 6, 2012 9:00am EST
continues over the fiscal cliff. today the president h showcasing -- steve liesman asked the treasury sec temporary about the possibility of going over the cliff. >> i want to understand the administration's position when it comes to raising taxing on the wealthy, those making more than $250,000. if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no pros teblpect to the agreement that doesn't involve taxes going up on the wealthiest 2%. remember it's only 2%. >> i talk every day to our customers around this country, around the world sometimes for that matter too, but around the country, and they are all scared to death what happens in january, nobody knows, but all i know is going over the cliff is too hot to handle, it's an option we just can't stare in the face and there's no way we can do it. they will get us through this in one form or fashion. >> interesting call. conventional wisdom, obviously the white house and the secretary hardening their line, and a lot of people are saying the republicans are starting to fray
CNBC
Dec 11, 2012 9:00am EST
with a deal on the fiscal cliff? why? because it represents the beginning of american austerity. higher taxes in the long run, spending cuts in the long run, that is a headwind for stocks. not a tailwind. i know everybody's excited about the deal being made. but a substantial minority believes that's a deal for the fed stocks. the general consensus down here, current purchases, $85 billion, is going to continue. instead of $45 billion from operation twist, operation twist goes away, and you go to outright purchases of treasuries. and you continue with that $40 billion in mortgage-backed security purchases. the $85 billion, they're doing right now, continues in a slightly different form. you guys, we're talking about aig. just two observations on aig. you'll notice here, it looks like to me they're not repurchasing any of their shares. they're dumping a huge amount of shares on the market. aig isn't actually buying it back. that's a signed of strength for the company. the other interesting thing is, the losses on sandy have been coming in recently. aig gave $2 billion in pre-tax losses. you in
CNBC
Dec 5, 2012 9:00am EST
be a fiscal cliff. the gulf is hotter than it's ever been even a few years ago it was ice cold. >> big story in the journal about exploration in this country. production 15-year high. brand new chapter here. look at the bottom of your screen. citigroup is cutting 11,000 jobs. we want to get to kayla tausche with more on that. >> we have a release that just hit the wire in citigroup where those jobs are coming from and a charge that the company plans to take in the fourth quarter because of these job cuts even though it expects them to generate $900 million in cost savings next year. interestingly this is the first move toward really slimming down citi by the new ceo. he has a quote in here saying these actions are logical next steps in citi's transformation and says they're committed to strategy that continues to leverage in the global banking market. if you go through the list of where these jobs are actually coming from, institutional clients group which is investment banking a quarter of the job cuts are going to come from there. my 2013 predictions i said that group would slim down by ha
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6